Answers

to frequently asked questions

What have we been asked many times?

  • Is it possible to test a night vision device before buying it?
  • What do I have to do to get a test device?
  • Can I get a test device without a hunting license and ID card?
  • What is the difference between the DJ-8 NSV 1×48 and DJ-8 NSV 1×56?
  • What is the sight range of the devices?
  • What do the performance classes (LK) mean?
  • Why are there different power classes?
  • What are the gradings?

Is it possible to test a night vision device before buying?

Upon request, we will provide you with up to two individual devices free of charge for a test period of seven nights. If the test convinces you, you can keep your desired device directly.

What do I have to do to get a test device?

Simply contact us and send us a copy of your hunting license and ID card (front and back) as well as your current phone number, also by e-mail.

Can I get a test device without a hunting license and ID card?

If you do not want to share your data, it is still possible to receive a test device. However, in this case we ask you to pay in advance. If our product does not convince you within the test week, we will of course refund the purchase price after returning the items.

What is the difference between the DJ-8 NSV 1×48 and DJ-8 NSV 1×56?

The devices are almost identical in construction. The main difference is the lens. As a result, the 56 lens, by its very nature, provides considerably more residual light to the picture tube. The result is not only more brightness, but also better image quality and a smoother image. This smoother image also allows higher magnifications of a primary optic.
Depending on the image intensifier tube, the DJ-8 NSV 1×48 is suitable up to approximately 10x and the DJ-8 NSV 1×56 up to 30x. However, this does not mean that both devices deliver the same image quality at, for example, eightfold magnification. The higher reserves of the DJ-8 NSV 1×56 always ensure better image quality when used with primary optics.

How high is the field of view of the devices?

This cannot be answered across the board. Here, the installed image tube, the quality of the primary optics, existing residual light, but also your eye and the resulting personal perception play an essential role. Ask yourself: Have you, for example, in the past, when buying a new pair of binoculars or a riflescope, asked about the possible range? Or was your question not rather aimed at the image quality.

What are the grades?

During the production of an image intensifier tube, dust can always be trapped, or shading or the like can occur. The grading indicates if and how many inclusions can be present:

  • First grade = picture tube without or only with very slight inclusions / defects,
  • Second grade = picture tube with medium to heavy inclusions / defects.

What do the performance categories (PC) mean?

The power categories refer to the performance of the image intensifier tube. Higher categories have more light amplification and a better signal-to-noise ratio, so they produce a better image.

Why are there different power categories?

As the largest civilian customer of the European manufacturer Photonis, we receive very large quantities of image intensifier tubes – so-called batches. These are then tested and categorized by our internal quality assurance department. This is done on the one hand by technical parameters such as signal-to-noise ratio, line pairs, light amplification, etc., but also the visual impression is relevant for the classification.